Tag Archives: Book Review

Book Review [A Book For Creatives]: “Show Your Work!” by Austin Kleon

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Show Your Work: 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered by Austin Kleon is a quick read, you can probably sit down and read it in an hour. However, don’t let the size fool you, this book is filled with a lot of great informationfor creatives trying to make a living out of their art. Show Your Work gives tips for the “starving artist”; it also is a great guide for people who are passionate entrepreneurs. The book is inspirational, but without the fluff, it is very to the point. The chapters are two or three pages long, with drawings and photographs, which makes reading the book go by so much faster. Definitely a must-read for creatives, or anyone who is passionate about branding themselves and starting a business. It is not a necessarily a step-by-step road to success guide, somethings will apply to you and some may not. Yet, the book is like a great pep talk, Kleon gives 10 easy tips on why and how you should share your art with the world. Kleon really understands the struggle of creative artists, because he is one. Reading through the book, I often said to myself, “How did he know I was thinking that?!”.

I will definitely keep Show Your Work on my bookshelf and refer to it often as I try pursue my side passions. It is also a great book to give as a gift to a fellow creative!

My Grade: A+

 

Book Review: Room by Emma Donoghue

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Room by Emma Donoghue is a book that will capture your heart. You have to be soulless to not feel something after reading this book. It’s a story about a five-year-old boy named Jack and his mother “Ma”, who have been living in a small room with no contact to the outside world. His mother was kidnapped and has been living in this room for seven years long before Jack got there. In her captivity she finds purpose as Jack’s mother. The mother and son relationship is the basis of the book.

Donoghue decided to write the entire story from a five-year-old’s perspective, making the plot less tragic and more inspiring. There are thrilling moments in the story, which makes the book a page turner. However, it was Jack’s innocence and growth, as a character in his circumstance, that intrigued me as a reader.

I recently saw the movie and I loved it! Go Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay! The book does have more twists and turns than the movie though. I’m guessing for sake of time since the movie is two hours long. I would read the book before or after seeing the movie.

I give the film adaptation an A+.

I give the book an A++.

Book Review: Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay

 

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Bad Feminist is a collection of essays by Roxane Gay. Her essays are a combination of personal accounts and crafty critiques on our culture. Gay’s arguments are smart and witty. Although I do not agree with every point Gay made in her book, I still value her opinions. I couldn’t put the book down, I was so interested in what Gay had to say.

Gay’s humor in the book is a plus. It also makes her stories relatable. I lost count at how many “GIRL, I FEEL YOU” moments I had reading this book. Gay is a great writer. She engages the reader in her personal accounts to the point that you feel that you are right there with her. In her critiques, she highlights the great strides women have made in our culture while also seeing the opportunities the feminist movement misses. Gay writes these essays not only as a woman, but as a woman of color. That alone is refreshing.

Bad Feminist also made me put a lot of thought into the word feminist. A word that is both powerful and soft.  There is a need for the feminist movement in terms of equality, and reminding society how AMAZING women are, in a world that often puts women second. Yet the feminist movement often leaves out the injustices that occur with women of color. There is a lack of understanding and therefore a lack of effort for racial injusitce. Feminists should focus on race more. Inequality is inequality, don’t focus on one and dismiss the other injustices. A tech entrepreneur once told me, “Being a woman and being black is like a double unicorn. I have to push twice as hard for my breakthrough.” This is why I think Gay’s book is needed today. It’s a different kind of book–not only for women but for men also. It was more relatable to me than any episode of Girls on HBO could ever be.

I give the book a B+.